Saturday, 10 September 2016

Life in the Hedge 10th September



To days talk was all about the hedges at Denso, led by  Steve , usual supporting gang were there with some new faces but still members of Denso


orange ladybirds (Halyzia 16-guttata)

Angle shades moth

Heron

Horse-chestnut leaf miner damage

Speckled wood butterfly

Harvestman (Paroligolophus agrestis)
 Nursery Web Spider
species of Tetragnatha (Spider)

Steve talking about poo !

 Fruits of the hedge


Willow Leaf Beetle (Lochmaea caprea)
feeding on Guelder rose



Willow Leaf Beetle (Lochmaea caprea)

10/9/16





Harvestman (Paroligolophus agrestis)

10/9/16
Paroligolophus agrestis is a species of harvestman. It occurs in Europe, including the United Kingdom.

Mature females have bodies about 6 mm long, mature males are smaller at about 4 mm. As with almost all havestmen, the second leg is longest, being around 14–20 mm when fully extended. The patellae and tibiae have distinct angles rather than being rounded. The upper surface of the body is usually brown with grey and red shades, with a line of whitish markings along the centre. The tendency to red is regarded as a useful identification character. There may be darker markings at the rear with lighter lines across the body. The area between the eyes is notably light in colour. On the underside, the genital plate is notched, particularly in the female – a distinctive feature of this species. (LINK)

Speckled wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria)

10/9/16
The Speckled Wood is a common butterfly and familiar to many observers, especially in woodland where, as its name suggests, it is most often found. The appearance of this butterfly changes from north to south, forming a "cline", where individuals in the north are dark brown with white spots, with those in more southerly locations being dark brown with orange spots. This has given rise to a number of subspecies (LINK)

Angle shades moth (Phlogophora meticulosa)

10/9/16
 Wingspan 45-50 mm.

A highly distinctive and unusual moth, which rests with the wings folded longitudinally, looking very much like a withered autumn leaf.

The adults generally fly between May and October, in at least two generations, but can be found in any month.

The species is also a common migrant and can occur in large numbers at coastal locations. It occurs throughout Britain, commonly in places, and more so in the south.

The larvae feed on a variety of herbaceous plants.(LINK)

orange ladybirds (Halyzia 16-guttata)

10/9/16
The orange ladybird ( Halyzia sedecimguttata) has 12-16 white spots. It overwinters in leaf litter or sheltered positions on trees and eats mildews. Considered until 1987 an indicator of ancient woodland, it has become widespread since it became common on sycamores; it has recently moved on to ash trees. It is attracted to light and is often found in moth-traps (LINK)